Therapy Services

A physical therapist is a highly trained professional who evaluates and treats children and adults who have difficulty with strength, balance, and mobility.

What do our PT’s treat?
 
1. Decreased range of motion - limits in moving the head, neck, body or limbs.
2. Gross motor delays - delays using large muscles, such as walking, running, and skipping.
3. Balance and coordination.
4. Decreased strength

A speech language pathologist is a highly trained professional who evaluates and treats children and adults who have difficulty with speech and/or language. Although many people think of speech and language as being the same thing, they actually have very different meanings. If an individual has difficulty with speech, the problem is with the “how to” of talking. If an individual has difficulty with language, the problem is with understanding and using words in order to communicate.

What do our SLP’s treat?
1. Speech disorders or delays, including articulation disorders, phonological disorders, apraxia, and fluency (stuttering).
2. Language disorders or delays - receptive language (understanding language that is heard, understanding and following directions), expressive language (difficulty communicating wants, needs, feelings), and pragmatic language (social communication).

An occupational therapist is a highly trained professional who treats children and adults who have difficulty participating in activities relevant to their daily lives. These activities can include self-care activities such as dressing and feeding, play and leisure activities, and work. For children, “work” is playing, learning, and going to school.

What do our OT’s treat?
 
1. Fine motor delays - difficulty with cutting, handwriting, buttoning, picking up small items. Fine motor delays involve small muscles, muscles in hands.
2. Decreased strength - difficulty performing age appropriate weight bearing movements of the upper body.
3. Bilateral coordination delays - difficulty using both hands together to perform a task, such as catching/throwing a ball or tying shoes.
4. Sensory processing disorders - difficulty responding appropriately to different sensory experiences (touch, taste, sound, vision, movement) which interferes with the ability to perform daily activities.
 
 
 
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Contact Us
 
List of All Forms
1000 Buchanan
Clarksville, AR 72830
479-754-6210
info@forresterdavis.com
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